Sunday, May 08, 2011

Red Cross and such

Does anybody have reliable info about how much of donations to Red Cross and such big charities actually goes towards the cause? Are they just big business or do they help?

9 comments:

J Bryan said...

If you mean disaster releif charities then the American Red Cross is one of the worst, their president has an outrageous salery and they do not spend the money for the purpose that they raised it. Notice ARC doesn't even show up on this list:

Charity ratings

eolake said...

Thank you, that list is just the kind of thing I was looking for. It's hard enough to decide to part with one's money without considering it may be used for luxury furniture rather than help...

BaronessBlack said...

There's lots of different organisations within both the international committee of the red cross, and the international federation of the red cross. Some of them do fantastic work, like helping to re-unite families split up by war and disasters. Others, as J Bryan points out seem to exist purely to pay themselves.
It's true that every charity has some good points and does some good work; but then as those who work in aid will tell you, "there's a lot of money in poverty!"

eolake said...

Yeah, or to rephrase: "there's a lot of money in other people's feelings of guilt."
Consider the Big Church Of Guilt, the Catholic Church, is one of the biggest businesses in the world.

Michael Burton said...

American Red Cross shows up under "Human Services" on J Bryan's list.

Michael Burton said...

Here's a site that breaks down the percentages:

http://www.charitynavigator.org/

There may be other sites that do the same thing for Europe-based charities.

Mary said...

I know of a worthy cause deserving donations..... Ethans Walking Strong Fund. Ethan is a boy of 8 that cannot walk properly because he has a condition that causes his leg muscles to tense up and his toes to bend under his feet which means that he can only walk on his toes causing great discomfort and also affects his balance. There is an operation he can have but not on the NHS in England. He can have the operation in America which has been successful in many cases similar to Ethan's. The problem is that it costs £55.000. His parents and Grandmother work 6 days a week as well as organising various fund raising events. I went on a sponsored walk ystdy and despite Ethan being unable to walk properly he insisted on tottering along on tiptoe to take part in the event. His parents had to plead with him to sit in his wheelchair but he told them that he was not giving up. When he got very tired and was in pain he did sit in the wheelchair but only for short spells. I have never met such a brave boy and he is an inspiration to all who know him. The bottom line is that if he does not have the operation he will be in a wheelchair permanently by the time he is a teenager.

St.Clair said...

Salvation Army has very low expenses.

CalgaryMark said...

http://www.charityintelligence.ca/?page=1 is a Canadian organization that rates charities that it has been asked to look at. Significantly, three Calgary charities rate highly - what a comment on the need in our wealthy city!

Some years ago I was the local rep. for a branch of the Canadian Cancer Society - I was asked how much was spent on 'administration', which was <5% at the time. However it all depends on how the books are kept - what may be 'administration' to you may be 'education and outreach' to me if paid staff are involved.

Eo, yours is a good question and worthy of someone's careful research. It has probably been done; I just don't know where all the answers are.