Thursday, September 23, 2010

Couriers and phones

It's weird to me that courier companies always demand a phone number for the recipient, but they never use it when they can't deliver, in my experience.

13 comments:

Ray said...

Maybe it's their way of confirming that you actually live around there.

Dave Nielsen said...

Maybe it's their way of confirming that you actually live around there.

I've always assumed that was the reason. I hate when they make me put it down, though, as I'm fearful that down the road they'll call me trying to sell me something.

ttl said...

They always call me. Every single time.

They have to because the outside door to the building is locked. So, I either have to give the delivery man the code that open's the door, or I need to walk down to fetch the parcel from him.

Did you really think that there's never any real need for the phone number?

Why would they need to confirm where you live? How could you even do that from a phone number, with any accuracy?

eolake said...

"Did you really think that there's never any real need for the phone number?"

No, that's why I have been so puzzled that they have *never* yet used it with any parcels I have received, nor sent.

eolake said...

But then I have never lived a placed with a locked front gate/door and no door phone. That sounds impractical. What if a friend or somebody visits, but doesn't have your number, or a phone?

ttl said...

What if a friend or somebody visits, but doesn't have your number, or a phone?

This hasn't been a problem for me; I know when to expect someone and make sure they get in. But I have noticed occasional strange behaviour at the front door. Like people waiting for someone to let them in, etc.

It seems everyone has a mobile phone these days. Maybe that's why they haven't installed a door phone.

Nokia should name one of their mobile phones "Door Phone". [This is actually a deep joke; I wonder if anyone gets it.]

eolake said...

Sure!! But you may have to explain it for *others*! (Cough.)

Dave Nielsen said...

But then I have never lived a placed with a locked front gate/door and no door phone. That sounds impractical. What if a friend or somebody visits, but doesn't have your number, or a phone?

Maybe it's really a halfway house?

Dave Nielsen said...

Why would they need to confirm where you live? How could you even do that from a phone number, with any accuracy?

Who knows, but sometimes they ask for weird information. In my case, since it's a house (which they should be able to tell when I don't put in an apartment number), having my phone number isn't necessary. They should maybe only ask for it in cases where someone lives in an armed compound with a locking outside door.

folds said...

[This is actually a deep joke; I wonder if anyone gets it.]

Eventually. Either your Finnish or your English pronunciation is abysmal, ttl, but your word play is good. It works better as "Door Nokia" imho.

Bruce said...

Google Voice gives me a free, semi-expendable phone number to go along with my free, semi-expendable Gmail account. I can save my personal email address and phone number for close friends and business associates.

eolake said...

Yes, I have long used an extra gmail address for the gazillion sites which demand one.

What happens if somebody calls that google number?

Anonymous said...

[This is actually a deep joke; I wonder if anyone gets it.]

Don't flatter yourself. It's just not funny. Maybe that passes for wit in Finland, but the rest of the world has a higher standard.