Wednesday, May 21, 2008

Chris Jordan quantity art

Chris Jordan quantity art.
Beyond the fairly blunt Socio-political messages, I just think some of the art is wonderful as art.



10 comments:

Pascal [P-04referent] said...

No. Effing. Way.
Did this guy actually gather soda cans to make a real mosaic image? For real, not a virtual CGI one?

eolake said...

No, I think they are assembled in computer from many photos.

Monsieur Beep said...

I remember a website which looked much the same (does it still exist?), where you could buy or rent pixels and a lot of companies did so and, looking closely, you could see their advertising and such.

Pascal [P-04referent] said...

I imagine just the impact that a real-life one would have.
And the SIZE of the thing!

By first making it with a computer software, it could be very doable.

eolake said...

Quite right.

Funny enough, I've long (since I was a kid) been interested in mosaics with various materials. Like beach pebbles, which varies enormously in color. I mentioned it to my art teacher in grade school, during a trip to the beach.

Pascal [P-04referent] said...

Nope, that's not funny at all.
I mean, "funny" as in "odd".
Now, if you meant "amusing" funny, then why not? But from an artistic mind like yours, not the least bit "odd" funny, no siree.

eolake said...

Well, just a funny coinkidink. Admittedly small and not *that* funny. :)

Anonymous said...

I would be impressed if this was done with real cans, but done on a computer it just seems a real waste of time. Artists are so lazy these days. What was the name of that guy who used to wrap buildings and stuff? He had some get up and go.

eolake said...

Yeah, Christo rocks, and he's still at it.

http://images.google.co.uk/images?hl=en&q=christo+art&um=1&ie=UTF-8

Johnnie Walker said...

It's cool to wrap a building, but I wonder what the point of that kind of thing is. It would get old quickly. Once you've done it people would it's cool but so what? I'm just curious as to what art historians say is supposed to be the significance of his work.