Sunday, August 15, 2010

It was an early Sunday morning





7 to 7.30 am Sunday 15th August. Camera: iPhone 4.


Update: 
Dan said: 
Interesting study in everyday texture and construction technology. Food for thought. The images evoke memories of walking the earth in places ranging from Mew Jersey to Houston Street in Manhattan. Interesting that all were captured with your iPhone 4.,.,.Keep Experimenting Buddy - Dan Beyer (Former OMP Mktg Director

eolake:
... Yes, the iPhone 4 camera is real dang good. Unless it's taken against the light, giving you bad glare, or in very low light, there is virtually nothing to stop you from using it as a "serious camera". Certainly images from it can be put in photo books and such with no decline in quality visible, even if in the same book as pictures taken with much bigger cameras.
(If were are taking 3-foot prints, it's another game, of course.)

17 comments:

Robb in Houston said...

Nice bright colors... don't ever take my Kodachrome away...

Somebody needs to come up with a digital camera that emulates the saturation of Kodachrome (KM) 25 or even KM 64.

eolake said...

I'm sorry to be the one to break it to you (if I am), but I think they just stopped making Kodachrome.

ttl said...

In that case: bring it back! :-)

emptyspaces said...

Love the last one!

Anonymous said...

Eolake,
Much as I love your photos sometimes I want to suggest that you zoom in, or crop like on # 3. Just give me the horizontal lines and some detail on the brick, don’t need the street…
It’s taken me a while to catch on to your art. But I persevere!
For instance I really like # 1 & 2, and of course # 4. Perhaps a year ago I would have shrugged a shoulder. Which raises the interesting question of art appreciation.
Often I set things aside if I do not understand or appreciate at first blush. Then, upon review, I may find I thoroughly enjoy them. Thanks for the photos. What camera are you using on this shoot?
John

Michael Burton said...

It was an early Sunday morning, not long after humans had disappeared from the face of the earth.

Only the things the humans had built remained, for now.

AnotherAnonymous said...

I wonder whether I would get the same standard by strapping a camera to my dog, setting the interval timer to random and then pushing him out of the house for 15 minutes?
I hear they say that beauty is in the eye of the beholder, but this just smacks of the Emperors new clothes.
Surely you can find something more attractive to point a camera at, even where you live, this early on a Sunday morning, it can't be that difficult?

ganesha games said...

Very nice compositions. Lines and colors of everyday shapes and things are like a palette to you.

eolake said...

Thanks, EmptySpaces.

Thank you, John, I'm happy to hear it.
I used the camera in the iPhone 4. It's really good.
I considered cropping the street of in no. 3, but I find that then it has less space, the whole curve thing is broken.

Thanks, Mike.

Thanks, I think, Anon. I could find more attractive motives, like dew on leaves in morning sun, but they would be less interesting ones.

Thank you, Ganesha Games.

Rebecca said...

"It was an early Sunday morning..." devoid of what earthlings call life ... except for this one observer ... who saw stark beauty where others, had there been others, would have felt a deepening confirmation of their burning desire to find meaning in something living... (!) RRR

Pascal [P-04referent] said...

I have to disagree with John: I think #3 is great the way it is and shouldn't be cropped.

Michael,
Very poetic!This is precisely why I love early mornings, especially with that neutral grayish light in autumn. The feeling of being alone in the world, left to peacefully watch around in silence, is rather enjoyable... while it lasts! Of course, living that way ALL THE TIME would soon become horrible. But in small doses? A very nice change from all the running around and the noise.

AA,
Your dog experience has been attempted already. In fact, to experiment a time portal exploring the year 2117, shortly after the World Wide Flood that wiped out all technology. Only a few shots were even clear at all, and a single one showed anything worth noticing besides foliage/grass close-ups.

"Beauty in the eye of the beholder"? Well then, I'd LOVE to behold "the EMPERESS' new clothes"!
8-P~~~

Rebecca,
Nice poetic expanding. :-)

artmanro said...

The first one it's my favorite,it could be even better if it would have in an editing program the banister selected and enhanced the edges a little bit.In all the four of them the light it's the main leading character,playing with it's tunes,it will gain more musicality.Thanks so much so beloved friend and brother in Christ Eolake.The Universal Love be upon all of us.Life is a daily miracle. With endless sympathy and admiration,forever yours,Paul Alexandru Cazacliu artmanro@yahoo.com

GregO73 said...

Your artistry and sensitive eye are always welcomed breaks in a hectic day!

eolake said...

Thanks, fellahs.

Dan Beyer said...

Interesting study in everyday texture and construction technology. Food for thought. The images evoke memories of walking the earth in places ranging from Mew Jersey to Houston Street in Manhattan. Interesting that all were captured with your iPhone 4.,.,.Keep Experimenting Buddy - Dan Beyer (Former OMP Mktg Director.,..

eolake said...

Hi Dan, Thank you. Good to hear from you again.

eolake said...

... Yes, the iPhone 4 camera is real dang good. Unless it's taken against the light, giving you bad glare, or in very low light, there is virtually nothing to stop you from using it as a "serious camera". Certainly images from it can be put in photo books and such with no decline in quality visible, even if in the same book as pictures taken with much bigger cameras.
(If were are taking 3-foot prints, it's another game, of course.)