Thursday, March 19, 2009

Flying trike

This is cool. (Butterfly LLC)
I'm interested in the fact that it seems the unpowered rotor on top (gyroplane) apparently is more efficient at low speeds than fixed wings. Seems counterintuitive to me.
But surely it also means that speed and range are quite limited, since the back rotor has to drag the top rotor through the air.

Update: Joe points to this interesting little flying car.

13 comments:

Bert said...

I'm interested in the fact that it seems the unpowered rotor on top (gyroplane) apparently is more efficient at low speeds than fixed wings

The lift (upwards force) generated by a wing is proportional to its speed in air. If the aircraft is moving at low speed, it isn't that hard to make a rotor achieve a higher speed through air than a fixed wing, hence increasing the lift.

Alex said...

Oh, you have to see "You Only Live Twice", that has a great autogyro dog fight sequence.

Autogyros are apparently very hard to fly, I've never seen anything bigger than a two seater. They've been around donkeys ages, probably to the 20's. Wikipedia dates the invention as 1919

Oh, Batman had one, well I never, back in 1939.

eolake said...

I think computer-stabilization may be making them viable now. He hints at that in the video.

Alex said...

The video link has gone. Ah well, such is life.

Yeah, computer assistance has to help.

eolake said...

Huh? I still see the vid, embedded in the post.

Alex said...

The still image is there, but the movie won't play, black screen "We're sorry, this video is no longer available".

eolake said...

Weird, still plays for me.

Joe said...

Looks like a step in the direction of having a personal flying machine. This has been the dream of many for years.

If the purchase cost can be kept reasonable. I think it has a future.
Joe

eolake said...

Only thing is how and where. I don't think it'll be allowed in cities.

tc said...

I like how lightweight it is and the idea that it seems safer(?) (where he can land it so safely, after cutting the engine) than an airplane-type, like this, but...I think I would still rather be able to get out of the elements like the plane idea. I just wouldn't want many of them out there...if they're not good drivers. It sure couldn't be any *prettier* in the sky! :-(

Anonymous said...

A good sized British design of the '50s, the Fairey Rotodyne had not just a great name, but was successful in all respects -except politically. The main rotor incorporated pulse jets for vertical take off, then those shut down for horizontal flight.

-Eric

eolake said...

Fokkin 'ell, what a big and beautiful machine.
And that could fly without power to the top rotor? Amazing.

Joe said...

tc said...

"but...I think I would still rather be able to get out of the elements like the plane idea."

www.terrafugia.com

It would be nice but it has a
purchase price: $194,000. This makes it a little out of my price range.

Oh well guess this is what dreams are made of.
Joe