Saturday, February 03, 2007

Lucky

In Danish we have an expression which could loosely be translated as: "that's more luck than it's intelligence". I think this is it.
(As usual, click for larger view. Author unknown.)


posted by Eolake Stobblehouse @ Saturday, February 03, 2007   24 comments links to this post

24 Comments:

At 3 Feb 2007 11:04:00, Anonymous king zod said...

Hello Sir Stobblehouse! I heard you lifted your censorship block. I am very pleased to come back (if you don't mind?)
Your photo is quite surprizing! Well done my friend! Yes sometimes "Luck" is all we have :)
Thank you my good man for letting me post on your wonderful site :)
Is Mr Pascal still posting? I hope so ? I like that peace-loving doctor.

 
At 3 Feb 2007 11:16:00, Blogger eolake said...

1: Thank you.

2: I did not take the photos, I don't know who did.

3: I'm sure Pascal is still around, though not here for a a few days.

 
At 3 Feb 2007 11:47:00, Anonymous ttl said...

Well, if such a thing as luck existed, which I don't believe it does, this would be about the best possible example.

In all its seriousness the photo is downright humoristic. :-)

 
At 3 Feb 2007 12:45:00, Anonymous Flip Dog said...

Well, if such a thing as luck existed, which I don't believe it does. ttl spoke

Very strange thoughts you have. If there isn't "luck" in the world than what else is it then?
Do you believe in fate? Destiny? Do you believe these things exist?
In my service,
Flip Dog

 
At 3 Feb 2007 12:51:00, Anonymous JJ Jelks & Co. said...

In all its seriousness the photo is downright humoristic. :-)

Sad indeed. You find humor in near tragedy. Sigh.

 
At 3 Feb 2007 14:04:00, Anonymous ttl said...

flip dog said: If there isn't "luck" in the world than what else is it then?

Luck, as it is commonly understood, means "happy accidents". I don't believe in accidents. I believe we create all events in our experience through our choices (=actions).

You could also define luck as preparation meeting opportunity. In this case the "accident" component is removed from the equation. I fully believe in this kind of luck.

For example, Eolake says his success with Domai was due to luck. I don't believe that at all. Rather it was preparation (or passion?) meeting opportunity. Had he not gotten the timing right now, he would no doubt have "cracked it" at some other point in time, perhaps with a slightly different approach.

 
At 3 Feb 2007 16:19:00, Anonymous Gandalfe said...

Wowser. Somehow this photo montage makes me feel lucky. I think I'll go practice some of brace of saxes. :o)

 
At 3 Feb 2007 21:43:00, Anonymous kimberely vaughn said...

I don't believe in accidents.

Perhaps an alien from another world could understand what you mean't by what you attempted to explain?
So when someone wins the lottery it wasn't luck or an accident? Hmmmm, it was all preplanned and arranged. Uh-huh. Ok?

I believe we create all events in our experience through our choices (=actions).

When we chose to walk on ice then fall, we planned on falling to start with? If there were no "luck" in the world then why play the lottery?
Happy accidents? (You refer luck as) yet you say there is no luck or accidents?
Your explanations leave a mind left in a maze of confusion. You can't have it as you attempted to express it.
Logically it is void. No offence.

 
At 4 Feb 2007 08:10:00, Anonymous ttl said...

Kimberely Vaughn,

I fully stand by my words, but at the same time I admit that I have in no way proven, or even properly explained, my point. I merely answered flip dog's question concerning my beliefs.

This is one of the most difficult metaphysical problems we humans have, and these commentary notes are not a very suitable medium for discussing it.

I will write a more proper treatise when/if I ever manage to create a blog of my own.

So when someone wins the lottery it wasn't luck or an accident?

Correct.

it was all preplanned and arranged. Uh-huh. Ok?

No. Not preplanned nor arranged. But not accidental either. The person is fully responsible. She created it through her choices.

 
At 4 Feb 2007 11:38:00, Anonymous kim vaughn said...

No. Not preplanned nor arranged. But not accidental either. The person is fully responsible. She created it through her choices.
ttl reference

we'll leave it at whatever you said but still made no sense at all.
bye

 
At 4 Feb 2007 18:08:00, Blogger Lucid Twilight said...

Since ttl and I seem to share similar viewpoints, I believe I can expound: she won the lottery because of her choices concerning what she thinks about and the images she holds in her mind. Basically, thought is the basis for reality and by focusing this energy and directing it you can write the script of your own existence.

The mind is multi-layered and we've added so many things which needlessly complicate our lives that this is a difficult truth to uncover, and it often proves to be much harder to apply. This principle is best demonstrated when all aspects of the mind, conscious and unconscious, are focused on the same ends. Most people, when they hear that thought creates reality, laugh condescendingly and note all the bad things that have happened to them despite what they wanted. What they didn't take into account is that their thoughts were likely hopeless (there's no chance in hell, but I want this to happen!) or they forced positivity (I feel like sh*t but I'm gonna tell myself I don't, even though I can't deny it deep down) or... The list of possibilities stretches on for miles.

This brings up the subject of latent emotional energy and the need to release it in order to enact change, but that is too large a subject to cover in a single post. The relevant parts can be summarized as such: we need to become conscious of the negative feelings and thoughts in our minds, bring that energy to the forefront, release it, and re-direct it in the form of new mental programming and an overall healthier state of being. This is how we eliminate bad luck.

This doesn't mean all things that appear bad stop happening. It does mean your point of view changes to such an extent that you make opportunities out of things that would have ended you in the past. Obstacles cease to exist. They are replaced by countless chances to improve your lot in life and raise your level of consciousness.

This post doesn't do this field of study justice, but I hope it's thorough enough to give you an idea of where we're coming from.

 
At 5 Feb 2007 01:50:00, Anonymous Ted Heinfield said...

Obstacles cease to exist. They are replaced by countless chances to improve your lot in life and raise your level of consciousness.

Lucid, are you saying that if we think positive all the time then the bad luck will stop?
Where is the opportunity of a higher level when we stare into the faces of our deceased loved ones?
Especially when they have been taken away by a random drive-by shooting or robbery? I'm not trying to sound negative but I believe my argument has valadity? Thanks.

 
At 5 Feb 2007 03:17:00, Blogger Lucid Twilight said...

Even then, your viewpoint determines how that experience impacts you. Contrary to popular belief even physical death needn't be viewed as something negative. That is not to say it is wrong to shed tears over the passing of loved ones, but it is to say that we can abandon our fear of death and gladly stare it in the face without the need to run, without the need to suffer, without the need to scorn it. Viewpoint shapes circumstances, and perception is more important than the circumstances. This means we'll begin to create more of our own luck and we'll stumble less with normally unpleasant surprises are thrown our way. There is always a blessing to be gained regardless of the event if we will allow it to be.

From this side of existence, it is difficult to say exactly what death is, or if there even is such a thing. In reality it may simply be a loss of awareness of a body, not an end to the soul. Many journeys may still await the deceased. Indeed, I believe this is the case. Although we identify with the body and it is a part of us while we're here, our essence is not tied to it. Whether it lives or perishes has no bearing on our ultimate fate. It is merely one pit stop on a nearly endless journey. And I do not believe the cause of bodily death factors into things; the person who died may or may not have suffered, regardless of whether they should have or not. Their perspective is what shapes their experience when passing. I have seen evidence of this in my own experiences. I have known those who died peacefully, with a smile, even though their bodies writhed during their final days and should have caused them much suffering. Then there are those who were supposed to die painlessly, yet they groaned every hour til their last.

And if death is real, and nothing awaits, I say that is all the more reason to make good on what we have now. If there is an end unto darkness, we'd best make this an existence worth remembering! There is no need to mourn the non-existent; they suffer not. The hole left in our hearts by their absence needn't plague us longer than a fortnight. The non-existent did not fear non-existence prior to birth, I doubt they should feel it upon returning to that state.

And a permanent heaven or hell? I think those to be fairy tales concocted by religion to justify the villainous acts of past exploiters of the people. Of course, they also served a positive purpose in calming those who were wronged by promising them their enemies would suffer for what they'd done at the hands of God. It eliminated the need for them to exact revenge on their own, pacifying our collective insanity for a few brief moments in time. But I could be wrong concerning this... Still I find it needless to worry considering I lack the absolute knowledge to choose the path that is correct. To live in fear of hell is to create it where I stand. That will not do.

Perhaps you cannot see how such events can be viewed differently. It was not easy for me either. How could tragedy yield any positives? How could death bring anything other than another kind of death, or worse, the same? Yet my greatest gains have always followed a death of some kind, whether it was the literal passing of my father or the metaphorical deaths I've experienced as I've grown. I see this world as a giant symbol of the truth, ergo if I have not perished in the philosophical sense I believe I can safely say I will not perish in any sense but the physical, if that. I no longer identify with my body as I once did. It is not my house, it is a means of interaction with the physical realm. When it is gone I remain unharmed. The pain it feels is not my own. This is merely a tool that I mistakenly identified with.

In summary, nothing has inherent value. The quality of each experience is determined by the observer, whether he directly controls it or not. The rest is one big wonderful mystery we should be glad to be a part of. Fear, in all its incarnations, proves detrimental to human endeavor. Regardless of our personal paths we're better off without it. The less we're afraid the less luck has to come into it, for we will suffer less and thus have clearer minds and stronger hearts.

 
At 5 Feb 2007 22:52:00, Anonymous Maurice Roberts said...

And if death is real, and nothing awaits, I say that is all the more reason to make good on what we have now. If there is an end unto darkness, we'd best make this an existence worth remembering! There is no need to mourn the non-existent; they suffer not.
Lucid spoke.

If death is real? Well certainly physical death is real. This is a proven fact. But spiritual death is the ultimate endless nightmare (if the soul winds up in Hell.)
Your words are troubling referring to dead people as "non-existent." They exist alright, not on Earth anymore but rather in one or two places according to God's unchangeable word. (After death that is.)
It's sad you think Heaven and Hell are fairytales. One day you will discover that the afterlife does exist and "if" you wind up in the lake of fire it will be too late for you son.


In reality it may simply be a loss of awareness of a body, not an end to the soul. Many journeys may still await the deceased. Lucid continues.

You speak scripture here and you are in line with the truth. But only "one" journey awaits the soul that lives on forever, not many.
For the soul itself lives on and on forever and ever.
I feel really sad for you Lucid. I know you may not like or even believe my words but they are from my heart.
You are certainly entitled to your opinion. Take care young lad.

 
At 6 Feb 2007 01:10:00, Blogger Lucid Twilight said...

And you're entitled to your opinions as well. I respectfully disagree with what you've said.

Also, I think you misunderstand what I meant when I spoke of the possible non-existence of the dead. That is not what I actually think, it is merely a possibility.

And there's always a chance heaven and hell exist, but I do not believe you have any way to show me beyond a shadow of a reasonable doubt that the doctrines you hold to are anymore truthful than those of other religions. I think I've said before on this blog that the only way I could be absolutely sure of avoiding hell is by following every religion and living by every creed of those who say we are in danger of damnation. But this is impossible; condemnation practically requires that all other paths be excluded, ergo it is a lose-lose. If I choose the wrong faith I will suffer, if I choose them all I will break their precepts and I'll meet the same end. My reasoning is that since I have no guarantees then I'd best make good on the time I've got here, so at the very least I can say I lived this life without regret.

And I honestly think I am doing exactly what I need to do. My aim to live fearlessly is justified, if the bliss in my heart is to be trusted. If I am wrong, so be it; I don't believe true salvation can be claimed if one is condemned for a mere untruthful belief in a world where the facts are not clearly spelled out by the divine. That sounds to me like an act of petty judgement, punishment unjustified yet called just.

In actuality, though, I don't believe the truth is so obscure, we've simply tampered with it to a degree that discerning truth from untruth is quite difficult. But I also think we obscured it partially so we could make use of it. When we're ready for the untainted facts, they'll be made plain before our eyes. In the meantime we'll do what we need to do to advance to that point.

Agreeing to disagree is perhaps the most essential step towards enlightenment.

 
At 6 Feb 2007 03:15:00, Anonymous Pascal said...

I don't exactly agree with TTL, about that notion that we make all things happen. But I'm convinced that luck is a belief. A matter of perception on things. So, criticizing his ideas so abruptly because you believe otherwise seems a bit extreme to me.
Allow me to explain where TTL and I differ in views. Some might consider this driver very lucky for avoiding near-certain death in this accident. Others might feel the accident almost happening in the first place was very unlucky. For some, winning the lottery was a curse in the disguise of a good fortune. ("Fortune", this is a good one!) Me, I'm positive that our actions and risk-taking are often very important (a heavy smoker getting lung cancer can't honestly call it "bad luck"!), but this is not the only thing involved here. Some random -or simply unpredictable- events will happen, and the difference between random and "which we just couldn't predict or expect" is pointless as far as our control over our own life is concerned. Which is the practical question. I believe both in shaping our own life, and in the existence of a part which we cannot control. Call it Destiny, God's hand, or the random irony of an unfeeling Universe, I'm sure it is there.

Now, time for a Pascal-style dubious joke.

A man wakes up in the hospital. His loving wife is there, holding his hand, when he speaks :
"You are here, by my side.
- Of course I am!
- God, you've always been beside me in times of hardship.
- Always, my love.
- When I lost my job, you were there. You were there when I had that car accident. When our house caught fire. When I broke my leg skiing. When my mother died. When my business went bankrupt. When I lost all my money in the stock market. When I had cancer. And now, when I've had this freak stroke. You know, honey, I've been thinking...
- Yes?
- I'm wondering, perhaps you're simply bad luck?"

Back to being serious a little. Good or bad luck is in great part a matter of attitude, of glass half full vs. half empty thing. I realised that much of the worst luck in my life actually turned out to have positive effects. I was devastated when my first crush played me and dumped me. After taking some distance, I realized that although I had genuine and sincere feelings, they were misguided : she was not for me, and would only have made me very unhappy for a much longer time by not rejecting me so early. Many "failures" proved to be much less negative than I initially believed. Either I avoided what was eventually revealed to be a very unpleasant subsequent life, or sometimes I simply gained maturity from it. I could also have chosen to become a drug addict and throw my whole existence away out of spite. What made the difference? My choice in attitude.

You can do it too. Everybody can. And, best of all, I'm not charging any money for sharing this precious insight with you! (Nevertheless, satisfaction guaranteed, or I'll give your money back. All of it.) ;-)

"So when someone wins the lottery it wasn't luck or an accident?"
It is a scientifically proven and irrefutable fact : 100% of lottery winners had bought a ticket. If you don't, you're sure to never win. That's logic 101, baby. And the rest is cold statistics. ("Which, like the wicked weasel and the mini-skirt, show you everything except what matters!", to quote one of my teachers)

"Where is the opportunity of a higher level when we stare into the faces of our deceased loved ones?"
Being somebody who has lost loved ones (haven't we all?), I can remind you that death is a part of life. Nobody's eternal. (Lucid Twilight might have something to say about this, but a person's earthly existence is by essence limited.)
It all depends on how our loved ones were deceased, I believe. I lost three of my grandparents, and every time it was only moderately painful : they were old, had been ill for a long time, and had reached the term of their life. When they died, essentially they stopped suffering needlessly. I only hope to lead a full life, not an endless one. Death is not always bad luck either. Sometimes, often, it's just... normal!
Of course, the premature departures you mention are quite different. And yet... Losing loved ones can also teach you compassion toward those who go through the same trial, and it sometimes brings together those who remain and had fallen apart. Courage is a great way of making your own luck. (And sometimes I should listen to my own sound advice!)
Your argument sounds extremely valid to me, Ted. I'll just remind you of the many grieving people who found in such an ordeal the motivation to struggle for a better and improved society. I wish you luck in this endeavour. (No irony intended by "luck".)

"This means we'll begin to create more of our own luck and we'll stumble less with normally unpleasant surprises are thrown our way."
In Lebanon, we choose not to expect anything positive from our very stupid politicians. And we're usually spot on. The good part is, that way we can only have pleasant surprises! (Otherwise they wouldn't be surprises now, would they?)

"I have known those who died peacefully, with a smile, even though their bodies writhed during their final days and should have caused them much suffering. Then there are those who were supposed to die painlessly, yet they groaned every hour til their last."
You've seen a lot for your young age. And noticed a lot, too. Because what you say here is very true.

"I no longer identify with my body as I once did."
Careful there. For the duration of our earthly existence, our mind, body and soul are one entity and function as such. For instance, having a simple cold will put you in a temporary depressive mood, whatever your mental attitude. (A side effect of endogenous interferon.) It's biological and proven. You ARE not your body, but it's a fundamental part of you. Only a part, but fundamental.

Maurice Roberts said...
"You speak scripture here and you are in line with the truth. But only "one" journey awaits the soul that lives on forever, not many."

I'm very curious here. I never noticed this specific part in judeo-christian scripture. Where is it said that there is only ONE journey, one chance for the soul, and that numerous incarnations, for example, are officially out of question? Please enlighten me.

 
At 6 Feb 2007 04:23:00, Blogger Lucid Twilight said...

"Careful there. For the duration of our earthly existence, our mind, body and soul are one entity and function as such. For instance, having a simple cold will put you in a temporary depressive mood, whatever your mental attitude. (A side effect of endogenous interferon.) It's biological and proven. You ARE not your body, but it's a fundamental part of you. Only a part, but fundamental."

But even these things can be brought under conscious control. I've come down with a cold without the depressive aspect entering into play at any point, and I've begun to shrug some things off that used to mark the beginning of at least two weeks of illness. I have not denied anything, I have not pushed myself beyond where it was safe for me to trek. It is simply my own experience that mindset can alter even that which should be unalterable.

And to further clarify, I do not mean to totally disregard the experience we have here, I am simply trying to look at it from a larger perspective. Surely the body cannot merely be tossed aside if we're to live here, and I am not advocating the one disregard his physical health for spiritual pursuit. It is an old idea, one based on the concept that we have to sacrifice one for the other, flesh for spirit, when it is my belief that a balance can be struck and neither has to be sacrificed. Indeed, to unlock our full creative potential all aspects of this realm must be put to full use. That means working at the level we're on just as much as it does looking forward and moving towards a higher state of consciousness.

 
At 6 Feb 2007 21:22:00, Anonymous Master Pascal said...

"Indeed, to unlock our full creative potential all aspects of this realm must be put to full use."

Now, that's what I call using you noggin! :-)
Of course control is possible. And its vast potential remains vastly untapped to this day. Far too often, it just feels very tempting to say "it can't be done" and quit trying. While in truth (as I bet you'd readily correct), "it has never been done yet", which is immensely different.

It'll be interesting to see over the years how far you manage to apply your theories. "Strong in this young one the Force is, Padawan Kenobi."

 
At 6 Feb 2007 21:33:00, Anonymous Pascal said...

Lucid Twilight said...
"the only way I could be absolutely sure of avoiding hell is by following every religion and living by every creed of those who say we are in danger of damnation."

Are you absolutely sure that would be enough? I mean, in the end, there's no solid proof that at least one of them is right, other than your belief in them. It's called "faith" for a reason... ;-)
(And there goes MY last chance of avoiding the fiery fate of those who ever dare to doubt!)

"in a world where the facts are not clearly spelled out by the divine."
They are clearly spelled out by those who contradict themselves but command that you trust them, like Newt Gingrich, Mark Foley or the Boston priests. What more do you need, man? A copyright statement written in latin on every atom and in the nucleus of every cell???
Actually, that would probably convince me... ;-)
"©, ® & ™ YHWH, all rights reserved. Cloning and modification prohibited. Reproduction strictly under Church permission." If my microscope showed that everywhere, I'd be convinced.
As my little brother once said to me : "What do you mean, it's yours? I don't see your name on it, so there!" Ain't no reply to that, you'll admit!

"Agreeing to disagree is perhaps the most essential step towards enlightenment."
I don't agree with that! Now, turn off that light, I'm trying to sleep here.

 
At 6 Feb 2007 22:03:00, Anonymous nildar said...

In Lebanon, we choose not to expect anything positive from our very stupid politicians. And we're usually spot on. Pascal quote.

So when you get depressed or angry about your "Stupid politicians" and your government it's okay? But when I say I get depressed by winter and it being a cold world you scorn me?
Sounds like a double standard here Mr Pascal.
I'm not always down or blue. But there are times when it happens. You sounded very troubled when you spoke about working a 100 hours or so without rest and how 40 some percent of your population have been leaving for Canada or Australia, this didn't sound very positive?
Just remember to pratice what you preach sir. No argument intended.
Nildar

 
At 6 Feb 2007 22:44:00, Anonymous me said...

I believe I can safely say I will not perish in any sense but the physical, if that. I no longer identify with my body as I once did. It is not my house, it is a means of interaction with the physical realm. When it is gone I remain unharmed. The pain it feels is not my own. This is merely a tool that I mistakenly identified with.

I think you speak in riddles concerning your ideas Lucid Twilight. Your body is your (temporary home) how else can you explain it? How can you say you mistakenly taken identity with it? This is beyond me? Cannot you feel with your fingers or feel your lungs breathe? So all that is an illusion?
The pain it feels is not my own? So if someone whacks you with a 2x4 someone else will suffer and you'll feel "nothing?" This isn't logical if I understand what you are trying to express?
How do you know for sure that when you "leave" your body you will remain unharmed? You cannot prove this. Yes, your body will no longer confine your soul but how do you know "for sure" that you will remain unharmed? That idea alone takes some kind of faith doesn't it?
Of course it does. You claim that if you follow all beliefs you could still wind up on the wrong track and yet you say when you die you will remain unharmed?
Basically you are admitting that you have faith in your own belief. But who is to say that your faith is correct? (I'm only comparing please remember this)
Mentally you attempt to explain it all away but it lacks credibility. But as others have said, You are entitled to believe whatever you chose too. But you do have your "own" faith whether you want to confess it or not.
Sincerely, me

 
At 7 Feb 2007 00:50:00, Blogger Lucid Twilight said...

"Of course it does. You claim that if you follow all beliefs you could still wind up on the wrong track and yet you say when you die you will remain unharmed?"

I'm saying there always remains a chance that I am incorrect in what I believe, yet it is my firm conviction that I will not face suffering when I die. I am not claiming absolute knowledge of that which I am currently incapable of knowing. I am acting on faith inasmuch as I trust these ideas enough to act on them and put them to the test.

I reject religion, I don't reject spirituality, or faith. I'd consider myself a mystic.

I do think of life as a dream, or an illusion. Is the pain you feel in a dream your own? Do you not awaken unharmed, regardless of how real the dream felt? Think of our waking life in the same way and you'll understand where I'm coming from.

If this is an illusion, nobody is experiencing the pain because no one is there. Your dreams never exist, do they? They have no lasting impact on the world around you. The whole thing simply vanishes. What we know as reality may be no different. In fact, I'm becoming more convinced that this is the case. It's not something I can argue, it's based on my own experiences, many of which cannot be adequately explained in words. I could describe them, yes, but the plain text medium doesn't allow for the feeling I would need to invoke in order to communicate even a little of what I want to express.

It's something that has to be proved personally, and I cannot grant a fool proof method of doing so. I only know what has served me, so that is the path I follow. In the end the only thing that matters is that we move towards a more peaceful and joyful state of being. Everything else is superfluous.

 
At 7 Feb 2007 02:19:00, Anonymous Pascal said...

Nildar,
I didn't intend to be scorning you, you know. Only to lift your spirits with some perspective. And I do believe a whole country steadily unraveling since 1975 is somehow more depressing than some seasonal bad weather, don't you agree? (Nevertheless, I'm very happy not to be living -or rather surviving- in Iraq, you can believe that!)

Happy to know you're not always feeling down. :-)

Oh, and I seem to remember saying earlier on this thread : "(And sometimes I should listen to my own sound advice!)"
So, as you can you see, I didn't wait for you to admit I speak better than I act. ;-)

You're right, there's no argument here, we're basically in agreement. Best to you then.

P.S.: Before you talk about a "cold world", perhaps you'd like to take that little "global warming" thingie into consideration, eh? ;-)

 
At 8 Feb 2007 01:19:00, Anonymous nildar said...

You're right, there's no argument here, we're basically in agreement. Best to you then.

P.S.: Before you talk about a "cold world", perhaps you'd like to take that little "global warming" thingie into consideration, eh? ;-)

Agreed. Best to you as well my good Doctor :)

 

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