Friday, February 04, 2011

Big music library

I just now noticed that when I look at my iTunes music library, and I only take my "top faves" list, I still have 8.4 days of music there! Dang. And I don't often go looking for new music, pretty rarely in fact. Makes me wonder about people who are really into it. I heard that Will Smith has to carry several iPod Classics if he wants to have all his music with him. And that model is mucho spacious.

14 comments:

Bronislaus Janulis said...

How do you find out how many days of music you have?

eolake said...

Ah: I'm reading "iPad: The Missing Manual", and when the iPad is plugged in, if you click on the colored bar at the bottom of the iTunes window, you get various ways of viewing how much there is of each type of content.

Alex said...

So if I wanted some Danish music, where would I shop? I see Cryoshell's CD is $60 in the us, 40 GBP from amazon.co.uk, and 40 EUR from amazon.de.

That's crazy. And I can't find amazon.dk.

eolake said...

No, they haven't seemed to make one.

I use:
http://www.imusic.dk/

Anonymous said...

Most people could pare down their music collection to fit on a single ipod. Even if the "essentials" wouldn't fit on a single one, it seems like a needless burden to carry several any time you're on the road.

ttl said...

Why collect music at all anymore?

After I discovered Spotify the whole idea of buying music (CDs or electrons) seems pointless. It's not just the expenditure in money, but even the act of clicking and downloading now seems kind of redundant.

[Spotify is not available in the US, I know, but they have a similar service the name of which I don't recall right now.]

Digital music stores must be on their last legs.

Dave Nielsen said...

People like to collect things. Vinyl records have come back in a big way. I wouldn't buy CDs, but like the low tech or at least significantly-lower tech of vinyl compared to CDs, downloading, or something like Spotify (which I won't use if it comes here; the idea is creepy in the same way electronic books are creepy).

Alex said...

The US on-demand used to be Rhapsody. It had a "radio" mode and a pay for pick a song mode.

We also have Pandora, which is sponsored and limit to 40 hours in the "sponsored" mode. In the paid mode it has unlimited commercial free. Give it a title or artist and it builds a "similar music" play list for you the gets tweaked when you "like" or "hate" a song.

I'm finding artists on Pandora, and then buying the CD so I can listen to whole albums instead of random tracks.

Alex said...

EO, thanks. CD I wanted is 140DKK, that's about $25, much more palatable.

Dave Nielsen said...

I've never heard of Rhapsody or Pandora, but if I had I wouldn't have fallen in love with them. I used to think people who were into vinyl were pretentious douches but now I can kind of see the point. It's not that it's better meaning superior, but for me that it's inferior - CDs are too perfect, and mp3s just too crappy. Fine for an ipod of course. So I'm not interested in anything like Spotify or its equivalents

Alex said...

I think I'm using Pandora more for a radio station that meets my tastes. I used to use the AV library for the same purpose.

CD v's Vinyl, availability is the big deal. I can find CDs, but since the number of artists recording to vinyl has dropped you're limited to fringe artists. Sure there is new vinyl in the music shop, but it counts for a very small sample size.

Whatever the source medium I still need it in my car and in the office.

Dave Nielsen said...

It seems like a lot of new stuff is being released on vinyl as well as CD, and older stuff is being re-released on it. I recently bought both Black Dub (a 2010 release) and AC/DC's Back in Black (1980) on a re-release 180g. So, you're definitely not limited to fringe stuff for new releases or having to scour thrift stores or whatever to find the older bands.

Dave Nielsen said...

I already have a huge CD library that I still add to, a fair chunk of it in a CD jukebox. I've downloaded a lot from itunes as well as I do need it to be portable. Maybe not that cost-effective but the reason vinyl is making a big comeback is that people want music to be more than something we listen to while doing other things. I remember many a time putting on a record, kicking back, and just chilling out listening to it while not doing anything else. Of course, I don't have kids.

ttl said...

Yes, I too am all for vinyl, especially if produced by a fully analog process (AAA).

It is bits (in CDs or sound files) that I have stopped paying for.