Friday, February 05, 2016

Your body language shape yourself

Don't miss this one, it splendid. Two minutes of body language "faking" can considerably increase your success rate.

Here's another cool one; how to spot lying.
Did you know that two strangers on average lie three times to each other in the first ten minutes?
(Notice the short video in the last third of a mother lying about who killed her children. That's a scary person, holy frig.)

5 comments:

JP Zhang said...

Yep, Amy is a great Ted speaker. To be honest, I am a bit surprised to know the strangers finding.

This gets me to think that we all should learn how to act (to "fake" people)...lol.

Russ said...

Wow! You know you've made it when you get a standing ovation at a Ted talk! I've often wondered about the contribution of confidence versus competence, leading to a person's success. And it's a timely talk for me, feeling a bit like cortisol overload of late. Thanks for posting this, Eolake.

Eolake Stobblehouse said...

Thanks, JP and Russ.

Hope you watched both videos. In some ways I feel like they go together.

Ken said...

There have been some recent negative comments on Amy Cuddy's work http://www.slate.com/articles/health_and_science/science/2016/01/amy_cuddy_s_power_pose_research_is_the_latest_example_of_scientific_overreach.html since it failed replication. There are several possibilities for this, one of which is that it was a spurious finding. It may be one of a number of studies that they tried, with the others not reaching statistical significance. There are possibilities that the original work was correct but given the apparent effect of minor changes it does seem optimistic.

It unfortunately seems the way of the world that some academics will run a single study, then promote it to death and produce a book. Science needs to fit into a structure, so they should have replicates and testing for other results that would be considered likely given the results of their study.

I've seen a few too many TED talks which were absolute rubbish. Makes you wonder what the fuss is all about.

Eolake Stobblehouse said...

It is a scientific observation that many experiments will swing heavily according to the experimenters expectations, and surely wishes.